Making Waves: The Computer That Runs on Water
Jun22

Making Waves: The Computer That Runs on Water

Manu Prakash, an Indian-born scientist currently working at Stanford University has already amazed the world in the past by building a microscope made completely of paper. Now the Meerut native has revolutionized science with a new computer innovation: a water based computer. Meet The New Stanford Water Computer This incredible new water computer has already taken the world of science by storm, but Manu Prakash claims that his major innovations are yet to come. Still, this new water based computer clock certainly deserves to be counted among them. Prakash, working with the help of two of his more advanced students, has once again achieved a major scientific and technological breakthrough using the most unlikely of resources. How The Water Computer Works What the Indian scientist has achieved is a fully organic computer system in which nearly microscopic droplets of water are trapped in a specially constructed magnetic field. When this artificially constructed magnetic field is rotated at a certain preset degree or angle, the droplets that comprise the inner workings of this water droplet computer move in a precise direction. This becomes the basis of a revolutionary new computer clock system. Why Does A Computer Need A Clock? Prakash has not only demonstrated the ability to devise a computer out of seemingly incongruous ingredients, but has also shown the way forward to creating an in-built computer clock that is destined to leave scientists gasping, while perhaps causing casual onlookers to wonder what all the fuss is about. Why does a computer need a logical and reliable clock, other than to allow buyers to know what time it is? The simple truth is that clocks, especially those built into modern computers, power nearly every piece of modern technology that can be named, from DVR’s, iPhones, Androids, and computer gaming systems, all the way up to more crucial implements such as; cars, military vehicles, and airplanes. Without a clock to synchronize the digital activity of any electronic device, they would soon fall into disastrous disharmony and thus be rendered completely useless. The New Computer Water Clock Is Breaking Big Prakash’s amazing new water clock is huge news precisely for this reason. By inventing a water computer, he has shown the way toward utilizing organic, completely safe, and toxin free components to make increasingly more complex and important technological devices. Such inventions could prove to have a huge impact on the environment. Promoting ecologically friendly technology is thus a major accomplishment in and of itself....

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3D Printing and the Cloud Level the Playing Field for Small Business
Jun18

3D Printing and the Cloud Level the Playing Field for Small Business

The small business is on the rise thanks to unexpected help from technological advancements like 3D printing and cloud computing benefits. 3D printing is helping some business owners grow and expand their products thanks to the innovative and quick design process supplied by these technologies. While many small businesses thrive in relationships with contract manufacturing partners, the 3D printing cloud offers a viable in-house alternative. An innovator can mock up a prototype and have it printed in a short amount of time. They are then able to test it on the market to see if it solves anyone’s problems. A product that can be created without having to worry if an order will be correct is a godsend for many business owners who lack the capital for a larger factory order. Instead, they can custom make and modify orders as they come. This keeps costs low and orders well in line for business. All they need to do is front the cost for the software and 3D printing machine—which is worth the investment if their business takes off. This keeps them competitive with bigger companies without worrying about cost ratio and markups. All they need is a viable product, a great website, and some solid marketing to really give the an edge in their specific market. Basic 3D printing for businesses does not cost much if they plan on using the printer to create high volume products over a long period of time. It is surely better than relying on a factory in Asia to make subpar products that may never get sold. A 3D printer gives small businesses the ability to create their products when a customer orders the specific product. They can also create different prototypes of the product to best determine the ideal shape, size and style of the specified item. 3D printing will change the face of how a small business works for the better. However, this would not be possible if it were not for cloud computing. The cloud is also an important aspect of small businesses because it allows them to use 3D printing without using large amounts of data on their server. Their intellectual property is protected online, and the cloud computing benefits keep their server from being overloaded with material. A specific cloud for 3D printing can hold all the information they need such as the prototype creation or the prototype design. This is a must for small companies that need the technology without the upkeep to do...

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Scientists Dig Up New Discoveries with Nanotechnology
Jun16

Scientists Dig Up New Discoveries with Nanotechnology

It’s been twenty years since Jurassic Park captured the imaginations of movie-goers with its fantastic and terrifying tale of prehistoric creatures brought back to life through revolutionary science. This past weekend the series debuted its latest chapter, Jurassic World, to eager audiences around the globe. The film has broken box office records and stands at the second highest US opening of all time. But is it really as much of a fantasy as we think? As audiences prepared themselves for opening night, Dr. Sergio Bertazzo was announcing the discovery of red blood cells and other soft tissue remnants in a cache of 75 million year old dinosaur fossils. These fossils had been stored under imperfect conditions at the Natural History Museum in London for the past 100 years, since their discovery at the Dinosaur Park Formation, located in Alberta, Canada. The general belief in the scientific community has been that the maximum survival rate of protein molecules was limited to 4 million years, while soft tissues were thought to degrade in less than 1 millionyears, even under optimal conditions. Soft tissue discoveries have been made in extremely rare cases, and were derived from exceptionally well preserved specimens. The samples analyzed by Dr. Bertazzo’s team at Imperial College, London dated back to the Cretaceous era, which ended 66 million years ago, leaving a significant gap between the date of the fossils studied and the expected time frame for usable organic material. By utilizing nano-analytical techniques, which employ a specialized microscope that creates cuts on a nanometric scale and is capable of moving infinitesimal particles within the sample, the team was able to identify amino acid fragments signifying the presence of organic materials. The ability to detect the presence of red blood cell and collagen fragments where there are no visible soft tissue structures presents scientists with some exciting prospects. “If we can find blood cells in lots of different dinosaurs, the range in size might provide an independent line of evidence for when dinosaurs became warm-blooded.”—Dr. Sergio Bertazzo, Imperial College, London It remains to be seen whether this increases the odds of discovering DNA, or cloning your own pet dinosaur, the insight into the biology of these distant ancestors can still provide a wealth of information for researchers. While the chances of a modern Velociraptor chasing Chris Pratt across your backyard remains slim, these developments are certainly no less exciting to scientists looking to expand our understanding of the natural history of our world....

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New Technology Could Mean the End of Drunk Driving
Jun12

New Technology Could Mean the End of Drunk Driving

The US National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) has unveiled its prototype of a new way to prevent drunk driving deaths. DADSS, which is formally known as the Driver Alcohol Detection System for Safety, is an infrared sensor system built into the steering column of late model vehicles. It possesses the ability to immobilize a host vehicle when it senses a blood alcohol level exceeding .08 mg. The sensor detects the presence of alcohol through the breath and skin. No additional action needs to be taken by the driver; the sensor reads their BAC as soon as they step into the car. The results are equivalent to using a car breathalyzer, or field sobriety test. The difference with DADSS is that no human initiative is necessary to activate the vehicle immobilization safety protocols. High speed infrared technology is programmed to sense air particulate percentages instantly. “Education, awareness and enforcement have succeeded in dramatically reducing drunk driving fatalities, but the advanced technology of DADSS brings enormous potential to save even more lives.” —Anthony Foxx, US Transportation Secretary According to recent statistics, there are almost 10,000 drunk driving fatalities each year. The key to reducing, or eliminating this statistic, is the presence of a technologically advanced driver safety device that supersedes impaired judgments. Most people understand that existing devices for checking BAC before driving are accurate, but only have an impact if a driver chooses to test him or herself before driving. However, self-reliance of BAC monitoring is impractical in the real world. This is why the new DADSS infrared sensor is a breakthrough in stopping drunk driving incidents. DADSS is still in the prototype stages, but a big push by a partnership between the US government and the auto industry are working hard to finalize its design. Society can no longer rely on impaired drivers to monitor themselves before choosing to drive drunk. Infrared and high speed blood alcohol sensor technology is a powerful way to make the roads safer for...

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Freight Farms Is Revolutionizing Urban Gardens
May05

Freight Farms Is Revolutionizing Urban Gardens

Founded in 2010 by Jon Friedman and Brad McNamara, Boston-based Freight Farms is poised to revolutionize the urban garden. Capitalizing on the growing trend toward locally sourced foods, Freight Farms provides a turnkey solution to those who want to grow large amounts of produce in a limited space. This facilitates everyone from the home gardener (albeit one who may be a bit more dedicated than the average backyard hobbyist) to large-scale wholesalers supplying the local restaurant and hospitality industries—and everyone in between. Requiring no more than a plot of level land large enough to accommodate a 40′ x 8′ shipping container, Freight Farms’ “Leafy Green Machine” (LGM) is capable of producing as many as 2,500 seedlings and 4,500 mature plants at a time. This enormous capacity is made possible by their use of a vertical tower growing area. Instead of growing in horizontal rows, plants grow from hanging towers of hydroponic pods, each lit by a patented LED lighting system that, according to the company’s website, “mimics sunlight and delivers the optimal wavelengths for uniform plant growth.” The container is equipped with two hydroponic nutrient delivery systems – one “ebb-and-flow” system for seedlings and a drip setup to support mature vegetative growth –  and environmental sensors that control temperature, humidity, and CO2 levels. Water quality is measured and controlled through temperature, pH, and EC sensors. Users can set parameters and receive notifications about system performance. Naturally, all of this can be monitored and controlled via the included 4G hotspot and your iOS device. (Really, is there anything that CAN’T be controlled by your phone or tablet these days?) Climate tracking, surveillance, and data logging all help make food safety and transparency a breeze. All you have to do is plug it in and start growing! Built by contract engineering and manufacturing firm Columbia Tech, the LGM is a truly scalable solution, perfect for those who want to grow (pun intended) beyond the capacity of a single unit. Because the system is built using stackable shipping containers, each self-contained unit is capable of being placed securely next to or on top of each other, greatly enhancing efficiency and output per square foot. Urban gardens and local restaurants may want to take notice…...

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Four Things Inventors Commonly Overlook
Apr28

Four Things Inventors Commonly Overlook

It is an unfortunate fact that both history and creative mistakes repeat themselves. History often highlights the ingenuity and skill of inventors, but conveniently ignores the creative, sometimes glaring, mistakes they make. Listed below are the four biggest mistakes inventors and modern product developers make – and how to avoid them. Lack of Vision Thomas Edison is immortalized for his amazing inventions, among the most famous being the phonograph. So how is it that the French inventor Édouard-Léon Scott de Martinville created the same technology 20 years before Edison – and why do we not know his name? Martinville invented the first device capable of recording sound waves in the early 1850’s. However, his invention could only record sound waves without playing them back. Martinville’s limited vision of the product’s capabilities caused the failure of his impressive invention. Lesson learned:  Product developers need to refrain from restricting creativity and brainstorming. Some of the most widely used inventions today, Velcro and Teflon to name just two, began as something completely different from what is now considered to be their primary use. Practical Functionality When Edison originally wrote about his phonograph, he had very different plans for it. Edison proposed about a dozen functions for the phonograph. These included dictation, letter writing and even talking clocks. However, these were insignificant compared to the phonograph’s “killer app” – listening to music. Edison tried to establish the functions of his invention without fully realizing the explosive potential of his machine. Lesson learned:  Inventors need to realize that their idea may evolve in a different direction than originally planned. Ignorance is not Bliss In the early 20th Century, American inventor Lee de Forest sold his half-baked and half researched “audion” invention to Bell Labs. This device created a monotone pulse of electromagnetic energy that manipulated gas flames. He believed his invention was perfect for transmitting Morse code. However, researchers at Bell labs found that the increase in the gas flame was caused by a sonic wave emitted from the spark, not the electromagnetic radiation. This invention eventually became the first vacuum tube, the foundation of the electronics revolution. Lesson learned:  Thoroughly verified and vigorous research and development is critical for any product development success. Demand Creates Supply Frederic Tudor was a 19th-century entrepreneur who wanted to ship frozen blocks of ice to tropical areas at a high markup. However, almost everyone in the tropical areas he visited had no idea what ice was or why it was beneficial. His first business trip was a failure, but he did eventually build up a successful ice shipping network. Lesson learned:  Innovative products cannot be forced on...

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